Beer Experiences From Around The World , Part 3

This post is dedicated to all beer lovers. We asked certain travel bloggers to share their beer experience with us and similarly to our latest post on 15 Beer Experiences From Around The World, Part 1 and 15 Beer Experiences from Around The World, Part 2,  we came up with some nice lager recommendations so get yourself ready for a  journey around the World in search of great aroma and best taste of local beers.

Beer

1. Korean beer.

Korean beer

“In my short time in Korea, I have found that the popular beers are just not that great. They taste too sugary and just aren’t for me. However, I have recently come across Queen’s Ale. It is made by one of the big beer companies in Korea (Hite) but has much better and refined taste than Hite itself. Its has a somewhat fruit-like flavor and i highly recommend it if you enjoy ales. Cheers!”

Author: Matt Inman is currently an English teacher in South Korea.  He is dedicated to travel as a means to learn about himself and the world around him.  He recently launched his own travel blog as a way to share his journey in the hopes that he can inspire others to make the leap and begin their own journeys. You can check it out at journeyinman.com.

2. Beer from Kenya.

 Kenya Beer

“Whether enjoying a sundowner on Safari, lazing on a beach or caught up in the frenetic hustle and bustle of Nairobi – Kenya is made for cold beer. As expected the country has its own ubiquitous brand – Tusker. The beer’s slogan is “Bia yangu, Nchi yangu” means “My beer, My country” in Swahili. Tusker Lager is the oldest and most famous beer brand in East Africa. The brand has two main variants – Tusker Lager and Tusker Malt Lager. Tusker Lager is available in a 330ml can, 500ml Euro bottle and a draught format known as Tusker Keg. Tusker Malt Lager is available in a 300ml green bottle. It got its name after one of the founders of Kenya Breweries, George Hurst, was mauled by an elephant while out big game hunting in the 1920’s.”

Author: Rachel of Safari254.

3. Beer from New Zealand.

tui-potw-01 

Tui is an amber-ish colour, flavorful, but still smooth and I had lots of good times drunk off it while living in New Zealand for a few months.”

Author: Lindsay of TheTravelWorldGuide.

4. Croatian beer.

 Ozujsko Pivo

I love beer, and a chilled bottle of liquid gold always lifts my spirit (pun very much intended). Tasting the local beer is a great and fun way to get to know a country. Last summer I visited the charming town of Dubrovnik in Croatia and got acquainted with Republika Hrvatska’s best selling beer, Ozujsko Pivo, and we got along quite well. This simple, light and easy-to-drink lager cost about $2 and was refreshing in the summer heat. And perhaps Dubrovnik is so breathtaking that it makes everything tastes better. We enjoyed this beer with fresh seafood and while looking out at the beautiful blue sea, as well as while watching life (and people) go by in cafes and squares! There are many reasons I love Dubrovnik and Ozujsko Pivo is one of them.

Author: Nita of Spillingthebeans-ng.

5. Beer from Belarus.

Beer from Belarus

“You don’t hear too much about the beer scene in Belarus (or anything about Belarus, for that matter). This beer is called Nikolayevskoe and is a local brew in Vitebsk, Belarus. I enjoyed it at a bar called Zolotoy Lev in the city of Vitebsk while there in March 2013. To be honest, Belarusian beers surprised me in a very positive way. Already a huge fan of Ukrainian, Lithuanian, Latvian, Russian, and Polish beers, I should have expected no less from Belarus, a country wedged between the five. Belarusian beer is cheap, robust, and always served with a smile. Just kidding about the last one. Maybe. You would have to go there yourself to find out.

Author: Megan Starr is an American globetrotter who has an extreme passion for beer, sports, and obscure locations. Currently residing in Oslo, Norway, she spends much of her time fleeing to locations that can offer a cheaper brew (which is everywhere). She runs and maintains her blog, Meganstarr.com, and also works with content, social media, and business development for Stay.com.

6. German beer.

Kloster Andechs Hell

“On a recent visit to the quirky city of Berlin, we had the best beer drinking experience till date. Tucked in a corner of Tiergarten, next to a beautiful lake, is a sprawling beer garden where tourists and locals get together for a pint (or two) of thirst quenching German beer. My favourite was the Andechs Vollbier Hell – a tangy and classic Bavarian beer  with a light and soft body, perfect for a summery day in Berlin. It has a floral sweetness to it, yet presents a bitter after note, making it a great combination. I am sure there are better beers in the world, but the crisp and cold beer married with the surreal setting was an experience I’ll remember for a long time to come.”

Author: Vid and Savi live in London and save their pennies to travel as often as possible. So far they have driven with zebras in South Africa, been caving in Austria, cavorted with Bedouins in the Sahara, befriended soldiers in Israel, and partied in a nuclear bunker in the Czech Republic- needless to say, they are constantly adding to that list. Explore the amazing photo-journals of their travel and fashion adventures over at their blog, Bruised Passports.

7. Beer from Brussels, Belgium.

brussels beer

“It’s difficult to send a non-blurry picture of night time drinking beer;) I had this Guinness in Delirium, Brussels, Belgium. You can find more things to do in Brussels. When I used to drink, Guinness was my favourite. The black colour and the intense flavour are most disliked by everyone (men and women) and what it makes me like Guinness more and more.  And more sure, no one would swap my beer for an emptier glass or “try to help to finish” as Guinness is not everyone’s taste. A pint of Guinness would usually cost around €3 back in the times.”

Author: Noelfy used to be a girl who dreamed with traveling the world. That was 20 years ago. Now she is making her dreams true. Animal lover and in love with the nature, dislikes the routine, refuses to have a “normal” life and has already visited +64 countries in less than 27 years and still counting. Working as a Flight Attendant, Cruise Ship Hostess or whatever that allows her to travel for free. She has the “no limits” attitude and wants to encourage people to break down limits and travel the world with no fear! Next adventure for April 2014 is to give birth to a future generation of world traveler, Pandita!

8. Beer from Japan.

Beer from Japan

“Japan loves it’s dry beer and Kirin, which translates as Giraffe in Japanese, is one of their favorites. Despite being mass produced, it’s high quality and refreshing flavor can be experienced through every can, bottle, or tap. In this way, it epitomizes Japanese culture, where every company strives to create the perfect product. Kirin goes especially well with Japanese food such as Sushi, Okonomiyaki, and Don Buri. It easily washes down rice and cleanses the palate.  And after two or three of these 750ml jugs, you’re ready to try just about anything. Did you say live octopus? Bring it on! Lobster brain sack filled with blood? Sure! And when you finally make it out of the drink buffet, bar, or restaurant, you’ve got the confidence to sing your heart out at Karaoke. So if you’re heading to Japan, definitely give Kirin a try. “

Author: When Leif was 16 he ran away from home and explored much of Europe and the Middle East without a dime. He is currently working on a book about this journey as he continues to  travel around the world. Through his experiences, advice and adventures, he hopes to prepare, empower, and inspire others to travel. Check him out at The Runaway Guide.

9. Beer from Bruges, Belgium.

Beer from Bruges

“The beer is a 2008 Vintage Pannepot Grand Reserva by De Struise Brouwers. I drank it for the first time at Café Rose Red in Bruges, Belgium. The cost was around 7 or 8 euros for a bottle. This beer is a quadruple style Belgian with 10% ABV. It has a dark fruity (almost cherry) taste to begin with…some subtle hints of oak, but nothing overpowering…great molasses/brown sugar notes with very little alcohol taste. The aroma of this beer is intoxicating in and of itself! A wonderful finishing beer for a night of drinking.”

Author: I’m Casey, an Air Force wife and transplanted Southern girl living a life of adventure abroad in beautiful Germany! Over on my blog, I chronicle my life as an expat, sharing our travels around Europe and my affinity for good food & wine, beautiful spaces, and trying new things. Hope you’ll stop by and follow along with our journey!

10. Beer from Iceland.

Tuborg Xmas Beer

“My favorite beer (right now) is Tuborg’s Christmas blend, an Icelandic beer. Iceland had a bizarre ban on beer which was only lifted in 1989. Since then, many small craft breweries have sprung up offering up a vast selection beer for it’s small population. I spent Christmas in Iceland and tried as many of the Christmas blends as I could and Tuborg was by far my favorite. It was light and slightly spicy – just right! Beers in Iceland are unfortunately expensive – about 7 euros or $10 US. Makes me miss living in Berlin where you could buy a beer for 2 – 3 euros!”

Author: Cherylhoward.com – A world travel and expat living blog to inspire you to travel more or even move abroad. Over 10,000 people follow Cheryl’s travels. Filled with wanderlust, Cheryl has been to 26 countries in North and South America, the Caribbean, and Europe. She even quit her job, sold everything she owned and moved to Berlin for 18 months. Now back in Toronto, Cheryl works as a freelance travel writer.

11. Beer from New Mexico.

Santa Fe beer

“It’s hard to travel anywhere in the U.S. that doesn’t have one or two breweries these days. On a recent visit to New Mexico, we discovered several, but the one I thirst for more than the others is Santa Fe Brewing Co. New Mexico’s oldest microbrewery, Santa Fe Brewing can be found throughout the state. My first taste came while sitting by the fire outside Orlando’s, an outstanding New Mexican cuisine restaurant in the mountain town of Taos. The Santa Fe Pale Ale is a full-bodied American Pale, a wonderful beer for a cool evening. And for those who love their beers hoppy, the Santa Fe Happy Camper IPA hits the spot.”

Author: Lance Wiedower is publisher of Trips By Lance, a family travel blog found at Tripsbylance. Lance believes great cultural experiences on the road shouldn’t stop just because children enter the picture. Lance and his wife take their son along on adventures around the world, exploring local cultures, art, food and beer.

12. Beers from Australia, Cuba, Mexico, New Zealand, Tahiti and Thailand.

Beers from Thailand, New Zealand, Asia

“The plan was different. I didn’t want to make my solo trip around the world, a trip in search of the best beer, but it turned out the way it turned out … At the beginning it was Singha beer with ice cubes in Thailand. Then Tiger in Malaysia and a Bintang in Indonesia. In Australia – James Boags ( btw, the best Australian beer is from Tasmania and they do not drink Fosters here). In New Zealand it was super good Speight’s and then blue Hinano in Tahiti. On the other side of the ocean it was Cristal in Chile and Cusquena in Peru. In Mexico there was Corona, Victoria and Leon. In Cuba, cheap Cristal in a can! After returning home it was time for Polish ‘Żubr’ (Bison) with raspberry juice (women in Poland drink beer with raspberry juice). Yes, it was definitely a beer trip around the world, but the question is – which beer was the best? Hmm… The winner is… French Polynesia and Hinano! It was a taste of real beer. A little bitter, a little sour, slightly bubbly and super cold is mandatory. If I had to describe the taste of beer, it is just like Hinano. Cheers mate!”

 
Author: One day she decided to leave everything and travel around the world by herself, with no experience. “You are crazy”, they were saying. Yeah, she is a little bit crazy… Who is she? She is a little girl with a big smile. She is the lover of her own life. She is extremely passionate about people. Her name is Julia and she is a Polish girl who moved to Australia. Why did she do that?  It’s a long and very romantic story… She’s a psychologist but she worked for years in media and then she decided to get to know the world better. She is a journalist and travel blogger, writing about travels, life, love and motivation. You can meet her at Whereisjuli

13. Beer from Namibia.

Hansa beer The Traveluster

“While traveling in Windhoek, Namibia, some friends and I enjoyed a few pints of refreshing Hansa beer with the local accoutrement: fried caterpillars. The delectable insects, tasting like a fried anything, were more a source of merriment and laughter than nourishment. Hansa is a crisp, Dortmunder golden lager with lots of bubbles and a dense head. It’s aromas and taste are floral, grassy, earthy, light pepper, pear and apple. There’s a good balance of malt/hop flavors with moderate fruitiness. It’s a very clean and inexpensive beer, costing the equivalent of about $2 USD.”

Here is my YouTube video, quite funny.
 [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIJg2e2LdiM]

Author: Lindsay is a freelance writer and runs the blog The Traveluster. She’s spent a lifetime traveling and studying culture, with degrees in anthropology and geography and a masters in international peace and conflict resolution. Currently living in Nashville, TN, she has previously called Baton Rouge, LA, Washington, DC, and Seville, Spain home.

14. Beer from Hanoi.

Bia Hoi

 

“Although it’s not the best tasting beer I’ve ever had, a cold glass of “Bia Hoi” in Hanoi, Vietnam was one of my most memorable. What makes this beer special is that it’s homemade, brewed daily and distributed to many of Hanoi’s local bars. It’s not strong and the taste is similar to a Miller or Bud Light. The best part though, is that you can have a glass for as little as 3,000 Vietnamese dong. That’s $0.15!It’s not the most sterile option for beer, but it’s the most authentic, and quenches your thirst on a hot sticky day.  Sitting on a cheap plastic stool on a busy street corner among a crowd of locals was one of my favorite memories in Vietnam.  We sat there drinking beer after beer watching the scooters zoom past until the keg was empty.  This happens every evening at these local joints, so if you want a glass, get there early!”Author: Ever since college graduation, Jessica has been on a continuous journey to see the world through the eyes of an expat. She first moved to South Korea to teach English for two years.  She now calls Spain, the land of vino and siestas, home. When she isn’t trying new tapas in Madrid, you will probably find her in the Asian supermarkets searching for authentic ingredients to make Pad Thai or Korean bipimbap. You can follow the journey via her blog, Curiosity Travels.

Which beer would you like to taste?

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