Travel Tips for Taking A Cheap Walking Holiday

Walking holidays are one of the best ways to enjoy seeing and feeling a country at your own pace. The benefits of travelling in this style are numerous. Not only is it ecologically friendly, it’s also far healthier than jumping on a bus or a plane and kicking back while feasting on chocolate and binging on in-flight entertainment.

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As for maximizing your enjoyment of a walking trip while keeping costs down, what kind of things, other than the obvious putting one foot in front of the other, can you do? Here we hope to offer a few pointers.

Choose a Destination that Fits Your Style

 Settling on a destination for your walking trip is more important than you think. If you’re more intrepid and active, than by all means go for something challenging, possibly trekking adventures in the mountain ranges of Asia or even tackling a dormant volcano or two. Obviously the cost of getting to your destination factors in but once there you shouldn’t spend too much.

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If you want something a little more relaxed and slower paced, Western Europe is a safe bet. France is one of the best countries for walking holidays in the world, and with organisations like Belle France you could even join in on locally organised walking tours to appreciate the town’s beauty first-hand, which is often more cheaper than you’d first expect too.

Minimal Packing

Another great way to keep the costs of a walking trip down is by packing as light as possible, meaning you can save on things like checking baggage or having your luggage moved ahead if you’re on a specific route.

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Walking with only the things on your back is much less daunting than you’d think. Literally hundreds of people set out to do this each day on one of Europe’s most famous walking routes, the Camino de Santiago.

Perhaps get specific gear items you might need before time from second-hand sources on the web. More times than not people will be willing to pass on camping gear or hiking gear that might prove useful for more off-the-beaten-track style trips that take you further away from civilisation.

Eat from Supermarkets and Shops

Another prime advantage of seeing a new destination on foot is that you don’t have to rely on getting fed in local restaurants or cafes. Moving through new towns and villages, there’s almost always somewhere to find cheap and inexpensive food. Hit up local markets too to take advantage of fresh produce and get the energy you need to continue onward.

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Walking also provides increased opportunity for spontaneous moments as well as bringing you in closer connection with locals. Don’t be surprised if you get asked onto people’s properties to share some food or drink, people are way more hospitable than the world media would give them credit for.

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Travelling in this style is a lot more enjoyable and cheaper than most people think. With only the elements outside of your control, you’ll realise just how little you need to truly experience a place and get everything you want from a trip.

How do you like the idea?

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33 Comments

  • Hi Agness,

    I can’t tell you how many places we’ve visited, where we did the motorbike bit – like in SE Asia – then when we did the walking bit in the same spot we visited a whole new place. No need to rush through any trip. Walk, soak up the scenes, get to know the people and you’ll have a brand new experience. Even if we do use a motorbike – like here in Bali – we walk a ton too, for getting to know the local people.

    Great share, keep on inspiring!

    Ryan

  • Agree with every word! Just a few days back did some extensive walking in order to explore some old churches and cathedrals of Mumbai. Have a great time in the city of love, Agness!

  • I think this is an absolutely fantastic idea, Agness! I like the part about light packing and not checking luggage or having to have it moved ahead to the next locale. Also what I REALLY liked was being invited onto people’s properties for food and drinks!! I would LOVE that part and sharing time with the locals. This was great, my friend! :)

  • I love it Agness! In fact it seems like you described my way of travelling and discovering a new city. I walk a lot and sometimes I exaggerate, but I seriously think it’s the best way to discover a new place and explore it.

  • I just love walking around in a city. Usually that’s what I end up doing because of 1) everything you mentioned above and 2) it’s far easier to follow a map and get walking than figure out the public transport system. And you definitely tend to see more of the city than when you’re zooming around from one bus/train to another.

  • I agree with every word. In our last paris trip, we took a walk from Louvre till Arc de triomphe. It was fabulous as it covered all major sightseeing in between. However, we got a bit more adventurous in Barcelona and took a walk from Parc Guell to Sagrada familia. It was not easy, but a downhill long walk. There was no sightseeing but we had time so we did it. We had fruits on the way and met few locals.

      • Hi Agness Walewinder,

        There was not much to do in Pago Pago other than walk around town and go to a few shops, restaurants or McDonald’s. We only had a limited time off our cruise ship so we decided to rent a car and drive out to the park. We found the Park Office just down the street. Look for the signs on the side of the road to guide you. Even if you don’t go out to the park the office is a very nice place to visit. They have displays of the typical flora and fauna you can see in the park and a continuous video that plays in the little side theatre. There was a very nice lady who was sitting at a desk and she gave us the information we needed so we could find where to go to see the most in a short time. Make sure you take comfortable clothes, water and good shoes. It is a very rugged area but, well worth the time.

  • Hello there! I’m very glad to read about my favourite city. Paris’ grandeur is inspiring but what I love most about the city is its intimacy. Its quarters are like a patchwork of villages, and while it’s one of the world’s major metropolises – with all of the culture and facilities that go with it – there’s a real sense of community at the local shops, markets and cafes that hasn’t changed since my last travel. Yet because every little ‘village’ has its own evolving character I’m constantly discovering and rediscovering hidden corners of the city.Yes, I enjoy Paris and France,they MUST be in everyone’s bucket list.

  • I absolutely love this post! We always visited cities on foot when I was young, and I still think it’s the best way to really see a place. Plus the added bonus of being the cheapest way to travel! I will never forget the day my parents and I spent trekking 10 miles around Seville! We saw everything there was to see, and really got to experience the city.
    Thanks for this post :)

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