Best Camera Strap for Hiking

A camera strap for hiking is a great little tool to keep your camera strapped securely and to keep your hands free while walking. It can also stabilize your hiking camera to give better quality photos while protecting it from crashing in case it accidentally slips from your hands.

What is the Best Camera Strap For Hiking?

To find the absolute best camera strap for hiking we have searched through most of the available hiking camera straps and read all the comments left by people who bought and used them. Then we compiled the list of the top 5 camera straps for hiking based on their pricing, specs and ratings by real users. Feel free to use the results of hours of our research now and thank us later in the comments.

Oh, and just so you know, there are also Buying Guide and FAQ sections below the top products that provide a handy overview of things you may need to know before and after you buy your new camera strap for hiking.

1. Blue Woven Vintage Camera Strap

Specs
Price: πŸ’² (fewer πŸ’² = cheaper)
Minimum length: 33 “
Max Size: 61 “
Width: 2 “

See it in your local store:

United States
United Kingdom
European Union
Canada
Australia

Art Tribute is a flexible neck strap that is suitable for most cameras and binoculars, and it is also the top choice on my list. The length ranges between 33 – 61 inches, which makes it versatile for shoulder and crossbody slinging.

The Art Tribute camera leash has more color variety than other straps on my list. The design uses a vegan fabric instead of animal hide leather to create different attractive designs. However, some users have found the material to be hard and irritating to the skin, while others find the 2-inch width uncomfortable for the neck.

On the flip side, the width is ideal for shoulder and crossbody wearing and is better for hiking because it gives you less fatigue. The strap also has a cotton lining that adds comfort at the contact points.

Pros

  • Attractive handmade designs,
  • Adjustable length for a secure fit,
  • Versatile for neck, shoulder, and sling,
  • Lifetime warranty,
  • 24/7 customer support

Cons

  • Materials may cause skin allergies,
  • Too wide for comfort

2. Peak Design Cuff Camera Wrist Strap

Specs
Price: πŸ’²πŸ’² (fewer πŸ’² = cheaper)
Width: 5 “

See it in your local store:

United States
United Kingdom
European Union
Canada
Australia

The Peak Design camera strap is a durable and attractive waist loop that can secure larger pro cameras due to its high tensile strength. It features an adjustable length, and it wraps around your wrist with a magnetic clasp that closes the strap like a wristband when not in use. However, some users have noted that it can cinch a little too tightly on the wrist, especially when using large cameras. Its anchor system allows the strap to be compatible with action cameras, binoculars, and other equipment. It features leather construction with aluminum hardware and Dyneema cord anchor pieces that make a stylish design.

Although the Peak Design cuff is attractive to pros and amateur photographers, it is pricey considering that it is limited to the wrist. It is also not ideal for hiking because it does not allow your hand to be free unless you detach it from the cuff.

Pros

  • Premium quality with a lifetime warranty,
  • Connects quickly with anchor links,
  • Versatile to use with GoPros and binoculars,
  • Adjustable to fit any wrist size

Cons

  • Only suitable for wrist wearing,
  • Expensive for some customers

3. Peak Design Slide Lite Camera Strap

Specs
Price: πŸ’²πŸ’²πŸ’²πŸ’² (fewer πŸ’² = cheaper)
Width: 3.1 “

See it in your local store:

United States
United Kingdom
European Union
Canada
Australia

This Peak Design hiking camera strap features an adjustable length and aluminum anchor mounts that are compatible with a tripod. It features a 32mm wide nylon webbing strap with a smooth top with a grippy bottom to prevent slipping while wearing on the shoulder and is suitable for mirrorless and light DSLR cameras.

The Slide Lite camera strap is the only one in my list whose anchors are compatible with a tripod. It is also versatile to use as a neck, shoulder, and sling that makes it ideal for hiking. However, some users have noted that the material is stiff, while anchor clips may cause scratches on the camera. Besides that, the strap is high quality, strong and durable for heavy pro cameras.

Pros

  • Durable aluminum quick adjusters,
  • Secure, low profile anchor mounts,
  • Multipurpose for neck, shoulder, and sling

Cons

  • The strap is stiff and bulky,
  • The anchor clips may cause scratches on the camera

4. BlackRapid Sport Camera Strap

Specs
Price: πŸ’²πŸ’²πŸ’²πŸ’²πŸ’² (fewer πŸ’² = cheaper)

See it in your local store:

United States
United Kingdom
European Union
Canada
Australia

BlackRapid is a sling strap for your camera for right-handed users only. It features a wide shoulder pad for comfort and an adjustable length up to 67.5 inches for fitting. The strap securely locks the camera with brass and zinc-alloy CR-3 locking carabiner, and it features a nylon webbing construction that is water-resistant, breathable, and durable.

The BlackRapid hiking camera strap is suitable for hiking because it allows quick access to the camera while keeping it out of the way. Though it is a high-quality camera strap and the premium choice on my list, it has limited use, unlike the Peak Design Slide Lite and the Blue Woven Vintage camera straps that are versatile in use. The rear clip is also its weakest point, as noted by some users, and it can cause the camera to crash on the ground.

Pros

  • Adjustable length for fitting,
  • Features a comfortable shoulder pad,
  • Comfortable moisture-wicking fabric,
  • Lightweight for a backpack mount

Cons

  • For right handed users only,
  • No color variations,
  • Expensive

5. STUNTMAN Pack Mount Shoulder Strap

Specs
Price: πŸ’²πŸ’²πŸ’² (fewer πŸ’² = cheaper)
Width: 2.5 “

See it in your local store:

United States
United Kingdom
European Union
Canada
Australia

The StuntMan backpack camera mount features a wide base plate with two non-slip belts that loop around your backpack’s shoulder straps. The loop and a Velcro hook provide secure fitting, and its base plate is wider than other brands.

The mount is suitable for both shoulders, which makes it ideal for both left and right-handed people. It has an adjustable length with a ball joint that helps direct your camera at any angle.

StuntMan hiking camera strap is compatible with most brands of action cameras and gimbals for stability. It is the most suitable for hiking because it fits snugly on the shoulder and allows your camera to record hands-free. On the downside, it is only compatible with action cameras such as GoPro, and its screw lugs are weaker than other brands, and they break easily. The company also offers a one-year warranty compared to the lifetime warranty of other brands on this list.

Pros

  • Multipurpose shoulder mount,
  • The ball-joint allows camera angle adjustments,
  • Compatible with most action cameras,
  • Features a non-slip construction

Cons

  • Poor quality material,
  • The screw lugs break easily

Verdict

We went through most of the camera straps for hiking available today and considered what people who used them are saying about these hiking camera straps. We also looked closely at their pricing and specs to find that Blue Woven Vintage Camera Strap is the overall best camera strap for hiking out there.

However, Blue Woven Vintage Camera Strap is a very good affordable alternative for those who want to get one of the budget hiking camera straps.

For those who need the absolute best of the best, regardless of the price, Peak Design Slide Lite Camera Strap is the premium pick.

What You Should Know Before Buying Camera Straps For Hiking

Overview

Although you can consider the hiking camera strap as an accessory, it does offer some benefits to your hiking experience. The buying guide below will help you understand the types, materials, and using your harness effectively in your hike.

Types Of Camera Straps

The wrist strap resembles a bracelet, and it attaches to the camera on a single point. It is suitable for small and lightweight cameras and may not be ideal for hiking because it keeps your hand busy. On the other hand, shoulder straps can also double up as cross-body straps. It makes them better for larger cameras and long hikes because they distribute the weight evenly across your back.

Neck-straps are the typical types that come with most cameras and can also double up as shoulder straps. They are suitable for lightweight cameras and short hikes because the weight on your neck may strain your spine. The dual camera harness features two camera attachments and is most suited for professional engagements. However, of all the types described above, camera clips are the most suitable for hiking because they allow you to attach your camera conveniently to your backpack.

Whichever type you choose, you may want to consider if the harness is compatible with your camera and storage when not in use. Also, you may appreciate having bonus features such as compatibility with other equipment like binoculars and tripods.

If you have a DSLR camera, the shoulder strap might be the most suitable for you because it can hold heavy cameras. Professional photographers almost always use shoulder straps due to this reason. They are also more comfortable for the back and flexible to work with two cameras.

Camera Straps Material

Nylon webbing and paracord are the cheapest and most available materials for making camera straps. These materials are durable, strong, water-resistant, and are useful for making other types of hiking and camping gear. However, nylon loses its bright colors over time due to sunlight exposure and may become unattractive.

On the other hand, neoprene is a synthetic rubber with high-tensile strength, water and UV resistance, and padding for comfort. However, it is more expensive, and the material is not breathable. Leather is another camera strap material to consider because it is quite stylish and comfortable to wear. However, it is also pricey and not as durable as nylon.

Attachment And Setup

While attaching the strap to your camera seems like an easy enough process, tethering it the wrong way could end up with the leash sliding out of its tether and crash the camera to the ground. The few simple steps below show you how to attach it the correct way.

Turn the plastic buckle at the ends of the strap right side up and thread the strap through the camera’s eyelet inwards and into the retainer piece. Once through the retainer piece, thread the strap through the wrong side of the buckle and pull. Here is a video that demonstrates this whole process.

YouTube video

The typical neck straps are 27-29 inches long, and depending on your height, the camera will hang around your abdomen area. A shorter length of 23- 26 inches is ideal for slinging on the shoulder, while a longer 27-inch length is for cross-body straps.

The strap’s width is another feature you may want to consider depending on the type of sling. Generally, wider straps will offer better comfort at the contact points, while slimmer ones will be more lightweight. For a neck strap, 1.5-inch or less is ideal, while 2-inch widths are excellent for shoulder and cross-body slings.

Questions and Answers About Camera Straps For Hiking

Is it safe to use a camera strap when hiking?

Yes, it is safe if you use the right camera strap that can hold your camera securely. You can also attach your action camera to your backpack with a camera mount such as the STUNTMAN Pack Mount Shoulder Strap. It provides a snug attachment that prevents the camera from swinging around when hiking.

Is A Camera Strap Only For Professional Photographers Or Hikers?

No, anyone who is fond of photography can have a camera strap for convenient use and to protect their camera.

We want you to know!Β Some links on this page may be affiliate links. We may earn a small commission from what you buy.Β 
It will never cost you extra, or make us bias, but helps us run this blog and occasionally get a good cup of coffee.Β 
As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

Agness Walewinder
Agness Walewinder
Travel freak, vagabond, photography passionate, blogger, life enthusiast, backpacker, adventure hunter and endless energy couchsurfer living by the rule "Pack lite, travel far and live long!"
Do you want to contribute?
Publish your guest post on Etramping!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.