Taste Of Portugal: 15 Best Desserts You Can’t Afford To Miss

My interest in Portuguese cuisine

My interest in Portuguese cuisine began in Macau where I tried Pastéis De Nata – famous crispy, flaky pastry with evenly layered butter and rolled very thin and folded neatly dough. I loved its glossy skin and its wobble texture.

A girl is eating cake and drinking tea in Lisbon
Sweet dinner in Lisbon

After trying this sweet treat in Macau, I decided to try some Serradura which is simply a Portuguese sawdust pudding. The biscuits are crushed super fine so it looks like sawdust. It is in a cake slice form, very creamy and cold, like a hard ice-cream. Perfect sweetness!

Pastry shop in Lisbon
Pastry shop in Lisbon

This summer I finally made it to Portugal. Although I mostly explored Lisbon and Fatima, after a few days and decent treats I can say that I’m a big fan of Portuguese cuisine – more precisely Portuguese desserts!

A Taste Of Portuguese Desserts

Right after I arrived in Lisbon, I’ve noticed that Portuguese had a major sweet tooth. There were plenty of bakeries and pastry shops around selling heavy on cream, egg yolks and sugar goodies. The whole city is filled with charming chocolaterias and yummy-looking galaterias.

Pastry shop in Lisbon

Here is a list of best Portuguese desserts you can’t afford to miss when in Lisbon (or any other Portuguese city, village and town):

#1 Pastel De Nata.

Pastel de Nata

World’s famous egg custard tart in filo dough that is best served warm, fresh out of the oven and sprinkled with cinnamon and powdered sugar.

#2 Toucinho do Céu.

That’s a classic Portuguese cake based on almonds and egg yolks.

#3 Bola de Berlim.

It’s a doughnut-like dessert with no central hole made from sweet yeast dough fried in fat or oil, with a marmalade or jam filling and usually icing, powdered sugar or conventional sugar on top.

 #4 Aletria.

It’s a Portuguese sweet pasta dessert served mainly at Christmas.

#5 Leite Creme. 

It’s a sweet dessert made with cream, eggs, and roasted sugar. Very simple and delicious.

#6 Fiovos de Ovos.

It’s a Portuguese sweet dish prepared with eggs (mostly of egg yolks that have been drawn into thin strands and boiled in syrup). It’s extremely sweet and yummy!

#7 Bolo de Bolacha. 

It’s a Portuguese biscuit cake with condensed milk.

 #8 Arroz Doce.

It’s a traditional Portuguese rice pudding with a dash of cinnamon and raisins on top.

#9 Pão de Deus (God’s bread).

It’s a brioche-kind of soft roll with a coconut topping just lightly sweetened and toasted in the oven.

#10 Coscorões.

They are sweet and crunchy fried dough pieces with a nice orange flavor to them mainly served for Christmas.

#11 Pastel de Tentúgal.

It’s a wrapped sweet pastry with a rich yellow egg cream inside.

#12 Folar.

It’s a traditional Portuguese bread (sweet or salty) served at the Christian holidays of Passover and Easter. 

#13 Cavacas.

Cavacas are Portuguese cupcake style pastry made with eggs, flour, confectioners sugar and milk.

#14 Eclair.

Portuguese eclairs are oblong pastries made with choux dough filled with a cream and topped with icing. 

#15 Malassada.

 That’s a typical a Portuguese confection made of egg-sized balls of yeast dough that are deep-fried in oil and coated with granulated sugar

SONY DSC

 What would be your choice when having a traditional Portuguese dessert?

Get insured

"It will never happen to me" said every person before it happened to them. Accidents happen at home and abroad. The difference is that they are usually more costly when you're in a foreign country. That's why travelling without insurance is a bad idea. There's just no excuse to put yourself in such a risk.

>>voice from the crowd<< Travel insurance is too expensive!

>>voice of the common sense<< If you can't afford travel insurance then you can't afford to travel.

Don't take chances and get yourself insured now. Check out our budget travel insurance page.

More from Agness Walewinder

5 Must-Visit Cities in Northern Spain

Top 5 cities you should make sure to check out along the...
Read More

74 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *